Ka'imiloa Chrisman (top left, bottom
left) is the Halau's Advisor on
Hawaiian Culture.
"Ka Uluwehi o Ke Kai" is a song
about the delicacies of the
sea--
limu or seaweed.
Click on photo for larger image
About Us
Halau Hula (Hula School)
Kumu Hula (Hula Master) Kehau Chrisman was
born and raised in Hawai'i on the island of O'ahu,
before moving with her husband to Cottonwood,
Arizona in 2003.  Her formal hula training began
in 1983, and
'uniki hula 'ailolo (graduation or
rites of passage) occurred 17 years later in 2000,
under the teaching of
Kumu Hula William
Kawaiponimo'ikapi'olani Pili Correa (
Halau Hula
o Pili
), who was himself a kumu hula graduate of
Halau Hula o Maiki, Ka Papa 'Ilima.  Her entire
Hula training has been within the
world-renowned Maiki Aiu Lake lineage (Leina'ala
Kalama Heine, Lahela Ka'aihue, Coline Aiu, and
Pili Correa).  With appropriate approval under
hula protocol, she started her
'auana (modern
hula) teaching career in 1997, and established
Halau Hula Napuaokalei'ilima in the year 2000,
teaching modern hula, ancient hula, and
Hawaiian language and culture.
Hawaiian Culture and Language
Hula, the art of Hawaiian dance, cannot be separated from the
culture, language, and values of Hawai'i.  Students of this Halau
are taught an integration of all these areas.
Hawaiian Hula Performances
Our Halau Hula  is available to share Hawaiian hula
entertainment at public events or private gatherings in
Arizona and frequently does so.  Our shows are
presentations of authentic Hawaiian culture and hula, and
reflect the respect that's
pono (proper) for this art.  (Please
note: the quick shaking of the hips with high headdress and
tassels in each hand is characteristic of the dances of Tahiti
and French Polynesia, not Hawai'i.  People see this overtly
sexy dancing as a part of commercial "hula" shows in
Hawai'i and elsewhere, and mistakenly think it is Hawaiian.)
To view a 4-minute video of one of our hula performances,
CLICK HERE.
Halau
Na Pua
O ka lei
'ilima
Kehau
Kumu Hula
'olapa
The flowers
Of the lei or garland
Hawaiian native shrub
bearing yellow, orange
flowers (
sida fallax).  The
delicate paper-thin
flowers are strung into lei.
Dew, mist, dewdrop.  
Pronounced "KAY-how".
Hula master, teacher.  
The use of the word
"kumu" implies the
attainment of formal
training, mastery, and
strong expertise, and is
reserved for the qualified,
tested few.
Dancer, as contrasted
with the chanter.
A structure used for
instruction, such as hula
Hawaiian Terminology
Halau Hula Napuaokalei'ilima, Central Arizona
Kehau Chrisman and W.K. Pili
Correa at Eo e Emalani i Alaka'i
Festival at Koke'e, Kaua'i, 2000
Halau performs "Na Hala o Naue" with
pu'ili (bamboo rattles), AZ Aloha
Festival 2007.
Ka'imiloa Chrisman presents a
cultural lecture to the crowd
about the Hawaiian drum
(pahu) and the unique double
gourd drum (ipu heke) at the
50th anniversary of The Heard
Museum Indian Fair in Phoenix,
March 2008.
Hawaiian Cultural Lectures
Our Halau Hula is also pleased to offer presentations and
lectures of Hawaiian arts and material culture, as well as
Hawaiian culture and values and the ancient-way of life, by
Ka'imiloa Chrisman, M.D., Kehau Chrisman's husband.  He is
a noted researcher, artist, craftsman, and  scholar of things
Hawaiian, and holds the title of Cultural Advisor for the
Halau.  He spent over 30 years in Hawai'i researching its
past, both personally and with many Hawaiian Elders.  His
previous workshops have included Hawaiian Stonework,
Ipu
Pawehe
(decorated gourds), Ipu Heke (double gourd
instrument),
'Ohe Kapala Kapa (bamboo stamps for
kapa),Weapons, Fishhooks, Cordage, Tattoo, etc. Topics for
lectures and workshops focus on old-time Hawaii, from
ancient times up to the early monarchy period, in the mid
1800s.
Please contact us for current prices of hula performances and cultural lectures, as
considerable cost, time and effort goes into the preparation of such presentations.
2013 Arizona Aloha Festival Performers